eBooks

At Home on the Mekong by Will Koenig

Cambodia is more than just genocidal communists, sweatshops and decaying temples. There's a vibrant culture — both unchanged for centuries and at the cutting edge of modernity — and endless adventures.
When I was 22, I was bored with university and work and decided to seek adventure.

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Cambodian Adventure by Ken Wadland

Abstract: Cambodian Adventures is a virtual visit to Cambodia through the eyes of one independent traveler. Ever wonder what it would be like to sleep in a hammock in a rain forest? What's it like to live in a village with no electricity? Where is the largest religious building in the world?

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Cambodia's Curse by Joel Brinkley

A generation after the Khmer Rouge, Cambodia shows every sign of having overcome its history--the streets of Phnom Penh are paved; skyscrapers dot the skyline. But under this façade lies a country still haunted by its years of terror.

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A War Too Long: The USAF in Southeast Asia 1961-1975 by U.S. Government and U.S. Military

Professionally converted for accurate flowing-text e-book format reproduction, this U.S. Air Force (USAF) book is an exceptionally readable and interesting overview of the role of air power in the Vietnam War and the conflict in Southeast Asia. The Air Force instinctively disliked the slow, gradual way the United States prosecuted its war against the Vietnamese communists.

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  • Published in Politics

The Political Economy of the Cambodian Transition by Caroline Hughes

Cambodia underwent a triple transition in the 1990s: from war to peace, from communism to electoral democracy, and from command economy to free market. This book addresses the political economy of these transitions, examining how the much publicised international intervention to bring peace and democracy to Cambodia was subverted by the poverty of the Cambodian economy and by the state's manipulation of the move to the free market.

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Golden Bones by Sichan Siv

While the United States battled Vietnamese Communists in the 1960s and 1970s, in neighboring Cambodia dictator Pol Pot and his Khmer Rouge declared war on their own people, enslaving and slaughtering anybody who disagreed with them. Sichan Siv knew he would soon be a target—ending up, perhaps, as one of the millions of anonymous human skeletons buried in his nation's Killing Fields—so he heeded his mother's pleas and ran.

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