eBooks

CAMBODIA - Solo & Single Adventure by Wayne A. Freeman

This is a genuine book with no sugar coating as though seen through a panoramic lens of bewilderment and wonderment.
Cambodia, Solo & Single Adventure tells of the first-hand experiences of Wayne Freeman as he explores the other side of a country, the side the glossy brochures don’t tell you about.  However they should tell you, because this book takes the time to explore and relate what nobody else bothers to.

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The Road of Lost Innocence by Somaly Mam and Ayaan Hirsi Ali

As a girl she was sold into sexual slavery, but now she rescues others.

The story of a Cambodian heroine. Born in a village deep in the Cambodian forest, Somaly Mam was sold into sexual slavery by her grandfather when she was twelve years old. For the next decade she was shuttled through the brothels that make up the sprawling sex trade of Southeast Asia. Trapped in this dangerous and desperate world, she suffered the brutality and horrors of human trafficking—rape, torture, deprivation—until she managed to escape with the help of a French aid worker.

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Stay Alive, My Son by Pin Yathay

On April 17, 1975, the Khmer Rouge entered Phnom Penh to open a new and appalling chapter in the story of the twentieth century. On that day, Pin Yathay was a qualified engineer in the Ministry of Public Works. Successful and highly educated, he had been critical of the corrupt Lon Nol regime and hoped that the Khmer Rouge would be the patriotic saviors of Cambodia.

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Survival in the Killing Fields by Haing Ngor

Nothing has shaped my life as much as surviving the Pol Pot regime. I am a survivor of the Cambodian holocaust. That's who I am," says Haing Ngor. And in his memoir, Survival in the Killing Fields, he tells the gripping and frequently terrifying story of his term in the hell created by the communist Khmer Rouge. Like Dith Pran, the Cambodian doctor and interpreter whom Ngor played in an Oscar-winning performance in The Killing Fields, Ngor lived through the atrocities that the 1984 film portrayed.

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Victims, Atrocity and International Criminal Justice by Rachel Killean

While international criminal courts have often been declared as bringing ‘justice’ to victims, their procedures and outcomes historically showed little reflection of the needs and interests of victims themselves. This situation has changed significantly over the last sixty years; victims are increasingly acknowledged as having various ‘rights’, while their need for justice has been deployed as a means of justifying the establishment of international criminal courts. However, it is arguable that the goals of political and legal elites continue to be given precedence, and the ability of courts to deliver ‘justice to victims’ remains contested.

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A Dragon Apparent by Norman Lewis

Originally published in 1951, it is said that A Dragon Apparent inspired Graham Greene to go to Vietnam and write The Quiet American. Norman Lewis traveled in Indo-China during the precarious last years of the French colonial regime. Much of the charm and grandeur of the ancient native civilizations survived until the devastation of the Vietnam War.

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The Long Road From Pub Street by Michael Desrosiers

In this short and entertaining travelogue, Michael Desrosiers tells the story of a slow journey overland across the Kingdom of Cambodia, a small, rural, and often-overlooked corner of Southeast Asia. The journey is unforgettable, but not always pleasant. Along the way he and his incredibly patient girlfriend contend with wild monkeys, a raging Typhoon, baguettes, jellyfish, and the dastardly "twerking bug".

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