eBooks

Father Missed His Plane: A Memoir by Vincent Lee

On April 12, 1975, just days before Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge seized control of Phnom Penh, Vincent's father missed a chance to take his family and leave Cambodia on a US Marine Corp helicopter. Had they boarded the chopper, Vincent would not have had to endure four years of brutality and starvation.

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How to Make a Living in Paradise by Philip Wylie and Mike Mecir

Are you seeking a richer quality of life?
The tips and guidance herein – backed by authoritative case studies and contact directory - are bound to save thousands of dollars and countless hours of research.
This guide has been written by seasoned expats in Asia for savvy individuals who are planning a smooth lifestyle adventure (or business sidelines) in Asia.

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Lonely Planet Southeast Asia on a shoestring by Lonely Planet

Lonely Planet's Southeast Asia on a Shoestring is your passport to having big experiences on a small budget, offering the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, what hidden discoveries await you and how to optimise your budget for an extended continental trip. Watch the sun rise over Cambodia’s temples of Angkor; hang out, hit the beach and learn to cook in Vietnam’s cosmopolitan, buzzing Hoi An; and kayak around the turquoise waters of Laos’ Si Phan Don. All with your trusted travel companion.

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Surviving the Global Financial and Economic Downturn by Hossein Jalilian and Sothorn Kem

In terms of magnitude of impact, the global financial and economic downturn was the worst of the three crises. That it caused the first ever growth contraction in the post-conflict period was sufficient rationale for the series of studies that substantiate this book. Like the two shocks that preceded it however, the way it impacted on Cambodia cannot be understood in isolation from the overall post-conflict milieu.

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Cambodia, 1975-1978 by Karl D. Jackson

One of the most devastating periods in twentieth-century history was the rule of Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge over Cambodia. From April 1975 to the beginning of the Vietnamese occupation in late December 1978, the country underwent perhaps the most violent and far-reaching of all modern revolutions. These six essays search for what can be explained in the ultimately inexplicable evils perpetrated by the Khmer Rouge. Accompanying them is a photo essay that provides shocking visual evidence of the tragedy of Cambodia's autogenocide.

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Dos & Don'ts in Cambodia by David Hill

Visit Cambodia with our little book of cultural Do’s and Don’ts will guide you through this wonderful land ensuring you emerge in love with the country and its hospitable people.
Our advice might sometimes lead you to suspect that Cambodia is the wild west of Asia where oddballs and eccentrics go off the rails. As Phnom Penh resident Dr. David Hill explains, there are foreign visitors who completely lose their way.

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  • Published in Cuisine

The Cooking of Cambodia by Martha Stephenson

Cambodian is a land known for its robust flavors and inventive meals that can be made by anybody, regardless of cooking ability. All you need is a willingness to learn and a craving for an exotic cuisine.

If you have always wanted to make an exotic cuisine, then look no further!

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Lonely Planet Cambodia by Lonely Planet

Lonely Planet Cambodia is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Watch the sun rise over the magnificent temples of Angkor, hit boho bars in Phnom Penh, and find a tropical hideaway in the Southern Islands – all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Cambodia and begin your journey now!

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The Sieve of Angkar by Sovannara Ky

This is a true account of what the author experienced when the Khmer Rouge revolutionary forces under Pol Pot took control of Cambodia in 1975. Swept from their industrious life of learning and enterprise in Phnom Penh, the Ky family was driven, along with millions of others, into the Cambodian countryside to fulfill Pol Pot's vision of a Communist, agrarian society.

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Victims, Atrocity and International Criminal Justice by Rachel Killean

While international criminal courts have often been declared as bringing ‘justice’ to victims, their procedures and outcomes historically showed little reflection of the needs and interests of victims themselves. This situation has changed significantly over the last sixty years; victims are increasingly acknowledged as having various ‘rights’, while their need for justice has been deployed as a means of justifying the establishment of international criminal courts. However, it is arguable that the goals of political and legal elites continue to be given precedence, and the ability of courts to deliver ‘justice to victims’ remains contested.

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