eBooks

Essential Siem Reap by Rodney L'Huillier

Home to the magical ancient temples of Angkor, Siem Reap Cambodia, offers something for everyone. Exploring the ancient temples once lost to the jungle, through to journeys into Buddhist culture, relaxing in 5-star comfort at bargain prices, a family escape, or backpacking your way and partying all night, Siem Reap has something for everyone.

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Lonely Planet Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos & Northern Thailand by Lonely Planet

Lonely Planet Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos & Northern Thailand is your passport to the most relevant, up-to-date advice on what to see and skip, and what hidden discoveries await you. Tempt your tastebuds with pho noodle soup in Vietnam, sail past the limestone peaks of Halong Bay, or experience the transcendent tranquility of temples like Angkor Wat; all with your trusted travel companion. Get to the heart of Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos & Northern Thailand and begin your journey now!

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The Long Road From Pub Street by Michael Desrosiers

In this short and entertaining travelogue, Michael Desrosiers tells the story of a slow journey overland across the Kingdom of Cambodia, a small, rural, and often-overlooked corner of Southeast Asia. The journey is unforgettable, but not always pleasant. Along the way he and his incredibly patient girlfriend contend with wild monkeys, a raging Typhoon, baguettes, jellyfish, and the dastardly "twerking bug".

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The Khmer Empire: The History and Legacy of One of Southeast Asia’s Most Influential Empires by Charles River Editors

The Khmer Empire, also known as the Angkor Empire, was a powerful empire of Southeast Asia that was established in 802 CE and ended in 1431 with the invasion of the Siamese and abandonment of Angkor. The Khmer Empire was responsible for many of the historic monuments and temples found throughout the jungles of modern-day Cambodia, and also in other countries of Southeast Asia, all made possible by the fact the Khmer Empire reached across modern-day Cambodia, parts of Thailand, Laos, and Vietnam, making it a strategic trading partner with ships traveling from China and India.

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  • Published in Society

Violence and the Civilising Process in Cambodia by Roderic Broadhurst,‎ Thierry Bouhours,‎ Brigitte Bouhours

In 1939, the German sociologist Norbert Elias published his groundbreaking work The Civilizing Process, which has come to be regarded as one of the most influential works of sociology today. In this insightful new study tracing the history of violence in Cambodia, the authors evaluate the extent to which Elias's theories can be applied in a non-western context.

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English-Spoken Khmer Dictionary by Keesee

This is a unique learning aid for making rapid headway in the acquisition of comprehension and speaking ability in Khmer, the language of Cambodia. In recent years, Cambodia has moved from a society menaced by war to a society orientated to commerce. With this shift in attention from military to social and economic matters has come an increase in the numbers of foreign visitors and residents in the country for the purposes of tourism, aid work or investment-related activities. Many of these foreigners or 'chun bor-tay' speak English as a first or second language, but know little of written or spoken Khmer.

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Laos & Cambodia by Adam Bray, Simon Stewart, Andrew Forbes and David Henley

Insight Guide Laos and Cambodia is the only full color travel guide to these two fascinating countries, and its lively narrative and stunning images provide both inspiration and information to plan a memorable trip to Indochina. The Best Of section shows you the unmissable sights and experiences – Angkor, the region’s most spectacular sight, as well as the two contrasting capitals: laid-back, French-influenced Vientiane in Laos and Phnom Penh, Cambodia’s animated capital on the banks of the Mekong River, plus markets, temples, relaxing beaches and islands.

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