eBooks

Cambodia, 1975-1978 by Karl D. Jackson

One of the most devastating periods in twentieth-century history was the rule of Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge over Cambodia. From April 1975 to the beginning of the Vietnamese occupation in late December 1978, the country underwent perhaps the most violent and far-reaching of all modern revolutions. These six essays search for what can be explained in the ultimately inexplicable evils perpetrated by the Khmer Rouge. Accompanying them is a photo essay that provides shocking visual evidence of the tragedy of Cambodia's autogenocide.

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  • Published in Politics

The Political Economy of the Cambodian Transition by Caroline Hughes

Cambodia underwent a triple transition in the 1990s: from war to peace, from communism to electoral democracy, and from command economy to free market. This book addresses the political economy of these transitions, examining how the much publicised international intervention to bring peace and democracy to Cambodia was subverted by the poverty of the Cambodian economy and by the state's manipulation of the move to the free market.

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A Dragon Apparent by Norman Lewis

Originally published in 1951, it is said that A Dragon Apparent inspired Graham Greene to go to Vietnam and write The Quiet American. Norman Lewis traveled in Indo-China during the precarious last years of the French colonial regime. Much of the charm and grandeur of the ancient native civilizations survived until the devastation of the Vietnam War.

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From Cambodians To Kiwis: A Legacy by Julie Chuor

Work hard. Raise children. Retire. And in between all that, have a little fun, eat good food, and travel. A normal life, for normal people.
For Kim and Helen Chuor, normal was what they desperately sought, without the in between stuff. During the five traumatic years of starvation and deprivation at the hands of Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge, all they wanted was the basics: food, a home, their family and most of all, safety.

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At Home on the Mekong by Will Koenig

Cambodia is more than just genocidal communists, sweatshops and decaying temples. There's a vibrant culture — both unchanged for centuries and at the cutting edge of modernity — and endless adventures.
When I was 22, I was bored with university and work and decided to seek adventure.

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  • Published in Politics

Dancing in Shadows by Benny Widyono

This fascinating book recounts the remarkable tale of a career U.N. official caught in the turmoil of international and domestic politics swirling around Cambodia after the fall of the Khmer Rouge. First as a member of the U.N. transitional authority and then as a personal envoy to the U.N. secretary-general, Benny Widyono re-creates the fierce battles for power centering on King Norodom Sihanouk, the Khmer Rouge, and Prime Minister Hun Sen.

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Cambodia Now by Karen J. Coates

Cambodia has never recovered from its Khmer Rouge past - the genocidal regime of 1975-1979 and the following two decades of civil war ripped the country apart. This work examines Cambodian life in the aftermath, focusing on Khmer people of all walks of life and examining through their eyes key facets of Cambodian society, including the ancient Angkor legacy, relations with neighboring countries (particularly the strained ones with the Vietnamese), emerging democracy, psychology, violence, health, family, poverty, the environment, and the nation's future.

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