Politics

Norodom Sihanouk was Cambodia's first Prime Minister in 1945. Sihanouk enjoyed many roles over the years including Prince, King, as well as Prime Minister. He was ousted in a bloodless coup in 1970 by Lon Nol. In 1975, the Khmer Rouge, Communist Party of Kampuchea, took control. In 1979, the Khmer Rouge fled to the northwest of Cambodia waging an ongoing war for almost 20 years. In 1993, the first democratic elections were held finally paving the way for a transition to democracy.

Governing Cambodia's Forests by Andrew Cock Featured

The widespread destruction of Cambodia’s forests in recent decades saw the loss of the last major area of pristine tropical forest in South-east Asia. The proceeds of often indiscriminate logging and sale of forest and plantation concessions have enriched the country’s ruling elite but cost its rural population dearly. It was, moreover, a process in which foreign aid donors were deeply involved, even if the outcome was contrary to their intentions.

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Cambodia and the Year of UNTAC by Tom Riddle

This is the untold story of what really went on when the UN tried to manage free elections in Cambodia. Told with Riddle's salacious wit and touching insight, The Year of UNTAC staggers from adventure to adventure, quagmire to quagmire, as the UN's bumbling bureaucrats seek to bring hope to a country reeling from war.

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Landscape, Memory, and Post-Violence in Cambodia by James A. Tyner

Between 1975 and 1979 the Khmer Rouge regime in Cambodia enacted a program of organized mass violence that resulted in the deaths of approximately one quarter of the country’s population. Over two million people died from torture, execution, disease and famine. From the commodification of the ‘killing fields’ of Choeung Ek to the hundreds of unmarked mass graves scattered across the country, violence continues to shape the Cambodian landscape.

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Behind the Facade by Lee Morgenbesser

Behind the Facade examines the question of why authoritarian regimes in Southeast Asia bother holding elections. Using comprehensive case studies of Cambodia, Myanmar, and Singapore, Lee Morgenbesser argues that elections allow authoritarian regimes to collect information, pursue legitimacy, manage political elites, and sustain neopatrimonial domination.

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Britain and Sihanouk's Cambodia by Nicholas Tarling

Diplomatic relations between Cambodia and Britain at the height of the Cold War provide unique insights into the overall foreign policies of both nations. King Norodom Sihanouk's strategy of preserving the independence and integrity of Cambodia through a policy of neutrality grew ever more challenging as the Cold War heated up in Indochina and conflict in Vietnam became a proxy war between the superpowers.

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