Language

Cambodian Advanced Transcription Course by Robert K. Headley and Rath Chim

The purpose of this course is to provide practice in aural comprehension and transcription of relatively difficult Cambodian material. It is expected that candidates for this course have successfully completed a basic Cambodian course, specifically the Dunwoody Press Cambodian Intensive Basic Course, and have had some additional experience in listening to and using the spoken language. The course begins with fairly easy material and progresses to Level 3 and 3+ material.

Read more...

Tuttle Practical Cambodian Dictionary by Tran Kien and David Smyth

This is a compact and travel–friendly Cambodian–English and English–Cambodian dictionary

The Tuttle Practical Cambodian Dictionary answers the need for a dictionary of Cambodian that is handy, current, and useful to those with little or no experience with the Cambodian language. With other Cambodian dictionaries are designed for those who can read Cambodian script, this dictionary provides entries in both script and romanized form.

Read more...

Cambodian (Khmer) Phrasebook by Samantha Tame

An English-Cambodian (Khmer) phrasebook intended to help anyone who is visiting Cambodia to start learning the local language. It includes phrases and vocabulary to do with greetings, family, jobs, numbers, food, shopping, accommodation, transport, and illness. There are also notes on pronunciation, grammar, formality and sentence structure, plus lists of common verbs, adjectives, adverbs, prepositions and conjunctions.

Read more...

English-Spoken Khmer Dictionary by Keesee

This is a unique learning aid for making rapid headway in the acquisition of comprehension and speaking ability in Khmer, the language of Cambodia. In recent years, Cambodia has moved from a society menaced by war to a society orientated to commerce. With this shift in attention from military to social and economic matters has come an increase in the numbers of foreign visitors and residents in the country for the purposes of tourism, aid work or investment-related activities. Many of these foreigners or 'chun bor-tay' speak English as a first or second language, but know little of written or spoken Khmer.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed

You have allowed cookies to be placed on your computer. This decision can be reversed.