Politics

Brother Number One by David Chandler

In the tragic recent history of Cambodia—a past scarred by a long occupation by Vietnamese forces and by the preceding three-year reign of terror by the brutal Khmer Rouge—no figure looms larger or more ominously than that of Pol Pot. As secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Kampuchea (CPK) since 1962 and as prime minister of Democratic Kampuchea (DK), he has been widely blamed for trying to destroy Cambodian society.

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The Playground by Terrence M. McCoy

Selected by the Washington Post as one of 2012's best works of non-fiction. "Showcasing the work of an unknown author of exceptional ability. ... an ire-inspiring account."
We've heard of China's buying sprees. That it's plowed billions of dollars into some of the poorest nations in the world. But the story we don't know is what this money means for the people there.

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  • Published in Politics

The Politics of Lists by James A. Tyner

Scholars from a number of disciplines have, especially since the advent of the war on terror, developed critical perspectives on a cluster of related topics in contemporary life: militarization, surveillance, policing, biopolitics (the relation between state power and physical bodies), and the like.

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Victims, Atrocity and International Criminal Justice by Rachel Killean

While international criminal courts have often been declared as bringing ‘justice’ to victims, their procedures and outcomes historically showed little reflection of the needs and interests of victims themselves. This situation has changed significantly over the last sixty years; victims are increasingly acknowledged as having various ‘rights’, while their need for justice has been deployed as a means of justifying the establishment of international criminal courts. However, it is arguable that the goals of political and legal elites continue to be given precedence, and the ability of courts to deliver ‘justice to victims’ remains contested.

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Behind the Facade by Lee Morgenbesser

Behind the Facade examines the question of why authoritarian regimes in Southeast Asia bother holding elections. Using comprehensive case studies of Cambodia, Myanmar, and Singapore, Lee Morgenbesser argues that elections allow authoritarian regimes to collect information, pursue legitimacy, manage political elites, and sustain neopatrimonial domination.

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Royal Rebel by Soma Norodom

In June 2010, Soma moved to Cambodia to take care of her sick father, who had decided to move from California to his homeland, and stay for the remainder of his life. She established the first English-speaking radio talk show in the country and later became a Columnist for the Phnom Penh Post.

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Cambodia and the West: 1500 - 2000 by T.O.Smith

This volume brings together an interdisciplinary team of established and emerging scholars from the disciplines of history, political science and communication studies, to provide a historical reappraisal of Cambodia’s relationships with the West. Contributors to the volume examine moments of historical import in Cambodia's history, from the sixteenth to the twenty-first century.

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The Politics of Decentralisation in Cambodia by Netra Eng

International development efforts have increasingly focussed on governance and institutional reform as a means to address poverty and accountability, in particular decentralisation reform wherein public officials are held accountable for their decisions and responses to the voices and demands of the people through local elections, and key public services are provided locally.

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How to Behave: Buddhism and Modernity in Colonial Cambodia, 1860-1930 by Anne Ruth Hansen

This ambitious cross-disciplinary study of Buddhist modernism in colonial Cambodia breaks new ground in understanding the history and development of religion and colonialism in Southeast Asia. In How to Behave, Anne Hansen argues for the importance of Theravada Buddhist ethics for imagining and articulating what it means to be modern in early-twentieth-century Cambodia.

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