Politics

  • Published in Politics

The Politics of Lists by James A. Tyner

Scholars from a number of disciplines have, especially since the advent of the war on terror, developed critical perspectives on a cluster of related topics in contemporary life: militarization, surveillance, policing, biopolitics (the relation between state power and physical bodies), and the like.

Read more...
  • Published in Politics

Dancing in Shadows by Benny Widyono

This fascinating book recounts the remarkable tale of a career U.N. official caught in the turmoil of international and domestic politics swirling around Cambodia after the fall of the Khmer Rouge. First as a member of the U.N. transitional authority and then as a personal envoy to the U.N. secretary-general, Benny Widyono re-creates the fierce battles for power centering on King Norodom Sihanouk, the Khmer Rouge, and Prime Minister Hun Sen.

Read more...

Cambodia's Economic Transformation by Caroline Hughes and Kheang Un

This is the first book on the transformations wrought by Cambodia's 2002-08 economic boom. It explores the impact of the boom on governance, economic structure, and opportunities for the poor. It provides new insights into the relationship between economic growth and political stability in post-conflict societies. It is a cross-disciplinary study involving Cambodian and foreign scholars.

Read more...

Cambodia: The Legacy and Lessons of UNTAC by Trevor Findlay

This book is an account and analysis of the United Nations peacekeeping operation mounted in Cambodia between 1991 and 1993 in fulfillment of the 1991 Paris Peace Settlement. Though jeopardized by lack of Khmer Rouge cooperation, the U.N. Transitional Authority in Cambodia (U.N.T.A.C.) successfully guided Cambodia back to democracy and relative peace. Findlay reveals the successes and failures of U.N.T.A.C. and draws useful lessons for future U.N. peacekeeping operations.

Read more...

Victims, Atrocity and International Criminal Justice by Rachel Killean

While international criminal courts have often been declared as bringing ‘justice’ to victims, their procedures and outcomes historically showed little reflection of the needs and interests of victims themselves. This situation has changed significantly over the last sixty years; victims are increasingly acknowledged as having various ‘rights’, while their need for justice has been deployed as a means of justifying the establishment of international criminal courts. However, it is arguable that the goals of political and legal elites continue to be given precedence, and the ability of courts to deliver ‘justice to victims’ remains contested.

Read more...

How to Behave: Buddhism and Modernity in Colonial Cambodia, 1860-1930 by Anne Ruth Hansen

This ambitious cross-disciplinary study of Buddhist modernism in colonial Cambodia breaks new ground in understanding the history and development of religion and colonialism in Southeast Asia. In How to Behave, Anne Hansen argues for the importance of Theravada Buddhist ethics for imagining and articulating what it means to be modern in early-twentieth-century Cambodia.

Read more...
Subscribe to this RSS feed

You have allowed cookies to be placed on your computer. This decision can be reversed.