religion

Killing Fields Living Fields by Don Cormack

The Cambodian Church was first planted among the rice farmers of North-West Cambodia in the mid-1920s. Growth was slow and painful. Then fifty years of nearly fruitless toil culminated in the incredible decade of the 1970s, when joyous spiritual awakening was juxtaposed with indescribable devastation.

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The Cham Rebellion by Ysa Osman

The Khmer Rouge kept constraining religion, bit by bit. First they forbade during work hours, claiming it was a loss of labor. Even when prayer did not impact work hours later in the day, they still would not permit it. They closed the mosque. One day during the Royaveitaros holiday [Raya Idul Fitri], some villagers made the difficult decision to ask for permission to observe morning prayers since this is such an important day in Islam.

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Cambodian Buddhism in the United States by Carol A. Mortland

Cambodian Buddhism in the United States is the first comprehensive anthropological study of Khmer Buddhism as practiced by Khmer refugees in the United States. Based on research conducted at Khmer temples and sites throughout the country over a period of three and a half decades, Carol A. Mortland uses participant observation, open-ended interviews, life histories, and dialogues with Khmer monks and laypeople to explore the everyday practice of Khmer religion, including spirit beliefs and healing rituals.

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History, Buddhism, and New Religious Movements in Cambodia by John Marston and Elizabeth Guthrie

This volume showcases some of the most current and exciting research being done on Cambodian religious ideas and practices by a new generation of scholars from a variety of disciplines. The different contributors examine in some manner the relationship between religion and the ideas and institutions that have given shape to Cambodia as a social and political body, or nation.

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  • Published in Culture

Spirit Worlds: Cambodia, The Buddha And The Naga by Philip Coggan

An absorbing study of Cambodian religion and beliefs covering everything from the role of monks in everyday life to beliefs in ghosts, gods and shamans. Belief in the supernatural covers every aspect of a Cambodian’s birth, life and death; life is a process of merit-making in order to maximize the conditions of their rebirth. Philip Coggan’s lively text describes the Buddha’s life, the establishment of Buddhism in Cambodia and the duties of monks within the monasteries.

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Oukoubah: Justice for the Cham Muslims under the Democratic Kampuchea Regime by Ysa Osman

The 1975-1979 regime of Democratic Kampuchea (DK), led by Pol Pot and the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Kampuchea, left more than one million Cambodians dead, their bones scattered like those of animals. All of the more than 6,000,000 people who survived the regime lived with constant horror and fear throughout those 3 years, 8 months, and 20 days.

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How to Behave: Buddhism and Modernity in Colonial Cambodia, 1860-1930 by Anne Ruth Hansen

This ambitious cross-disciplinary study of Buddhist modernism in colonial Cambodia breaks new ground in understanding the history and development of religion and colonialism in Southeast Asia. In How to Behave, Anne Hansen argues for the importance of Theravada Buddhist ethics for imagining and articulating what it means to be modern in early-twentieth-century Cambodia.

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Cham Muslims of the Mekong Delta by Phillip Taylor

This highly readable ethnographic study traces the settlement history and origin narratives of the Cham Muslims of the Mekong delta, describing their religious practices, material life, and relationship with the state (Vietnam and Cambodia), and showing the texture of their everyday life.

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